Let’s Amortize Daylight Savings Time

I’m sure by now you’ve read one of the 10-million blog entries reminding you to turn your clocks back. Remember “fall back, spring forward!”

What I’d like to see, is an amortization of the time change over the course of the year. Look at it this way, a one-hour change (60-minutes) spread out over 6-months works out to 10-minutes per month, or, approximately 2.5-minutes per week which is just about 30-seconds per day.

That daily change would be unnoticeable to all but the most time-sensitive among us.

Let’s face it, this whole time thing, not to mention daylight savings time, is an arbitrary creation. Why not make it a bit less disruptive?

This idea would not have been possible even just five or ten years ago. But now we clearly have the technology available to make it happen. Radio clocks are readily available. You can easily link your computer to time servers that automatically update your pc clock. Cell phones and pdas provide access to standard time servers that could easily reference the “new time.” The telephone time service is available. And official times displayed in public places could easily be converted to radio clocks.

Ok. I’ll admit that implementing this change could present a problem for all those atomic clocks out there. You see, according to Wikipedia:

“Since 1967, the International System of Units has defined the second as 9,192,631,770 cycles of the radiation which
corresponds to the transition between two energy levels of the ground
state of the Caesium-133 atom.” 

You got that?

Me neither. But what I think it means is that in order to amortize or spread out the existing time change over 6-months, the International System of Units would have to come up with two elements, one with a transition cycle slightly slower than that of Caesium-133 and one slightly faster: the first to bring us down to what is now the “fall back” transition and the other one to bring us up to what is now the “spring forward” transition.

Hey, just a thought.

 

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